Parent Resources

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The following information is from pta.org

A Sample of What Your Child Will Be Working on in Kindergarten

■ Counting objects to tell how many there are
■ Comparing two groups of objects to tell which group, if either, has more; comparing two written numbers to tell which is greater
■ Acting out addition and subtraction word problems and drawing diagrams to represent them
■ Adding with a sum of 10 or less; subtracting from a number 10 or less; and solving addition and subtraction word problems
■ Adding and subtracting very small numbers quickly and accurately (e.g., 3 + 1)
■ Correctly naming shapes regardless of orientation or size (e.g., a square oriented as a “diamond” is still a square)

Help Your Child Learn at Home

Try to create a quiet place for your child to study, and carve out time every day when your child can concentrate. You should also try to sit down with your child at least once a week for 15 to 30 minutes while he or she works on homework. This will keep you informed about what your child is working on, and it will help you be the first to know if your child needs help with specific topics.

Additionally, here are some activities you can do with your child to support learning at home:

English Language Arts & Literacy

■ Read with your child every day. Ask your child to explain his or her favorite parts of the story. Share your own ideas. To find more books for your child to read,
visit www.corestandards.org/assets/Appendix_B.pdf
■ Encourage your child to tell you about his or her day at school
■ Have your child describe the picture to you
■ Ask your child questions that require counting as many as 20 things. For example, ask, “Do many children have more than 20 books about wild animals?”
■ Ask your child questions that require comparing numbers. “Who is wearing more bracelets, you or your sister?” (Your child might use matching or counting to find the answer)

Talking to Your Child’s Teacher

When you talk to the teacher, do not worry about covering everything. Instead,
keep the conversation focused on the most important topics. In kindergarten,
these include:
■ Counting to tell the number of objects (this will not be written work; ask the teacher for his or her observations of your child’s progress in this area)
■ Solving addition and subtraction word problems

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